Set A: World urban population (Part 2)

About the dataset

The dataset was collected from World Bank’s website. This contains population density (people per sq. km of land area), urban population count, urban population as a percentage of of total population and annual urban population growth percentage for all countries for the year 2010. There are 210 records in total.

Visualization A.1.1

The box sizes represent urban population count for individual country. We filtered the data to include countries with urban population of 20 million or more. This resulted in 36 records. Countries with negative urban population growth are colored in pink – here we find only Ukraine under this criteria. Other countries are colored in a black to blue scale where black represents zero urban population growth and blue represents the highest amoung this countries (6.25%).

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Visualization A.1.2

The box sizes represent urban population count for individual country. We filtered the data to include countries with population density of 42 or more people per sq. km of land area. This resulted in 148 records. The coloring was done based on urban population as a percentage of total population. The lowest percentage (10.9%) is colored green, the highest percentage (100)%) is colored red and the midpoint (55.4%) is colored white.

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Visualization A.1.3

The box sizes and color both represent population density of people per sq. km of land area. The lowest value(0) is colored black and the highest(944) is yellow. The dataset was filtered to show countries with population density of 1000 or less people per sq. km of land area. This resulted in 201 records.

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Visualization A.1.4

This visualization is similar to the previous one (A.1.3). However, it was further filtered to show countries with urban population of 5.37 million or less resulting in 123 records. The blue color represents lowest (0) population density and white represents highest (944).

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Visualization A.1.5

In this strip treemap, the box sizes represent population density of people per sq. km of land area. The color represents annual urban population growth percentage. Negative values are colored in less darker brown. Positive values are colored from yellowish brown (0%) to dark brown (6.25%). The data is filtered to have countries with population density of 100 or more people per sq. km of land area (91 records). Countries are grouped into two equally dense bins for population density.

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Visualization A.1.6

This slice and dice visualization further filters the previous visualization to view countries with population density between 100 to 6631 people per sq. km of land area (87 records). Countries are grouped into 10 equally dense bins for population density.

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Visualization A.1.7

9 countries that have more than 1000 people per sq. km of land area are displayed in this visualization where the box sizes represent urban population. The colors are done arbitrarily to provide unique colors to countries.

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Visualization A.1.8

This is the same filtered data as the previous visualization (A.1.7) used in a striped format. The color represents population density with green being lowest (1066) and red being highest (19,847).

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Visualization A.1.9

This visualization shows countries with 23.3 million or more urban population. The box sizes are urban population count. The color represents population density with the highest being greenish yellow (19,847) and the lowest being purple(4). The coloring was done in 4 equally dense bin and the scale was logarithmic.

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Visualization A.9.1

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Visualization A.9.2

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Visualization A.9.3

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